50 Follower Giveaway & Structures of a Plant

I have talked before about how I will be planting seeds with my students the first day of school- well, in the interest of teaching content at (pre-planned) moments of convenience, that seems like a good time to teach about the structures of a plant!

I reached deep into the depths of Pinterest along with personal knowledge of activities which have worked in the past and have created a mini-unit to teach plant structures at the beginning of the school year. I am pretty excited about what I have come up with!  I wanted to share with you the ways that I am aiming to meet the needs of multiple types of learners to teach them these important standards.


First, for my visual learners, I created an anchor chart that will remain on the walls throughout this unit of study. 


For my "Art Smart" students I also included a number of different craft type activities including tracers to create a plant out of construction paper and sheets that look like coloring sheets for students to use during recess. On these laminated sheets, students would press different colors of clay onto the different plant parts. I'm not sure about you, but in my classroom students seem to love activities that revolve around our study but aren't necessarily "work". It's an odd balance that only a 9 year old brain can fully process... I guess. 




For students who are more puzzle minded, I included these sweet little cards that can be used for either a matching activity or for a short game of memory.






There are other written activities for students but the piece I am really excited about is a short lab. It makes a lot of sense to plant a plant as a lab activity in the classroom but I love the infamous "celery" activity as a more timely activity. The main idea is that you put a piece of celery into a glass of water with food coloring. Wait a few hours and come back to the celery and you will see that the leaves at the top have turned the color of the food coloring demonstrating that after taking in water, a stem does indeed carry water to the other structures of the plant. 





For this activity I have included a sheet that follows the scientific method to record thoughts, predictions and observations during the lab. Additionally, I created a fill-in-the-blank style lab report for students to record words and sentences to describe the lab and their learning. This will serve as a model for how to write up a lab later in the school year! 









I tried to take pictures of the celery experiment so you could all see how this works. The pictures are so-so... The experiment is very cool in person. Here you go! 

Before... 
Here is my celery the next day. See the blue on the leaves?
In real life you would!! In this picture... maybe?
Soo....Now we have gotten to the part of the post you are interested in! If you have decided you can't live without this pack, it's HERE in my TPT store where it will be 50% off until Friday Night! If you have decided that you want this pack for free, I am offering this pack to one lucky follower to celebrate 50 followers! (It's a landmark for me!) There are three ways for you to enter. First, you can follow me and leave me a comment letting me know you did that. Next, you can leave a comment letting me know which piece in the pack you would be excited to use. Last, you can mention my give away on your blog and leave me a comment with the link. I will then use an old fashioned random number generator to come up with the winner.

11 comments

  1. I am your newest follower! :)
    ❤ Sandra
    Sweet Times in First
    sweettimesinfirst@gmail.com

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  2. I'm loving the crunchy experiment!! The kiddos would LOVE to see that!
    I'm also loving your super cute anchor chart!
    ❤ Sandra
    Sweet Times in First
    sweettimesinfirst@gmail.com

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  3. I follow your blog and I became an official follower today! I would love your Structures of a Plant unit! I would love to use your Scientific recording form. Thank you for all you share!

    Donelle:0)
    welchdonelle@yahoo.com

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  4. The Crunchy experiement looks fun! My kids would love it!

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  5. I already follow your blog on Google Reader.

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  6. I love the scientific experiment lab form you created!

    welchdonelle@yahoo.com

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  7. I just found your blog! I'm a new follower!

    Jackie

    Third Grade's A Charm

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  8. I would definitely use the lab for the celery activity! We do that every year! We used red food coloring last year and observed the changes over a few days!

    Jackie

    Third Grade's A Charm
    thirdgradesacharm (at) ymail (dot) com

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  9. Love this blog. Getting wonderful ideas!

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  10. Just starting as a special ed consultant in 4th grade this year. I am a new follower of you and excited about all of your ideas.

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